Written By: David Turbert Reviewed By: Ninel Z Gregori MD Article Shared from AAO.org.

Ophthalmologists can only see the effects of AMD by looking closely at the retina. They use a special camera to shine light onto the back of the eye (fundus) and take pictures. Ophthalmologists call these pictures fundus photographs.

Drusen are fatty deposits under the retina. Hard drusen are not a sign of AMD. Soft drusen are closer together and form larger deposits. They can be an early sign of AMD.

AMD Simulation

View our AMD vision simulator to see how vision is affected by macular degeneration. The simulator shows how the world might look to someone who has AMD.

AMD Fundus Photographs

Here are some examples of what AMD looks like using fundus photography.

Dry macular degeneration

Photograph of the retina of a patient with Dry Macular Degeneration, showing soft confluent drusen.


A retina with soft drusen from dry AMD.

Dry macular degeneration

Photograph of the retina of a patient with Dry Macular Degeneration


A retina with dry AMD.

Wet macular degeneration

Photograph of the retina of a patient with Wet Macular Degeneration


A retina with abnormal, leaking blood vessels of wet AMD.

back-to-top

A Decrease font size. A Reset font size. A Increase font size.